They don’t think like you. Because they can’t see what you see, it seems as though they’re the ones blocking progress.

It’s easy to assign them as idiots. Putting them “over there” means you won’t have to put up with

their alternative universe—one that is surely fictional.

But that’s easy, and it means you will get little meaningful work done. It also leaves you with this: “They” become a painful reminder not of what’s wrong in the world, but of your inability to partner with those whom you passionately disagree. Because deep inside you know you have this capability. You know we must come together if we’re going to do anything significant at all.

So, you do what’s difficult. You go first: You set aside the need to make them wrong. You forfeit the judgment. You accept. You listen. And when you do, you experience something else you know is true: You discover a better path forward for us all.

You become the change we need.

Teams that do big things make different decisions. They choose a better way forward that brings out the best in all of us, rather than just in some of us. Do Big Things, coming out in August, highlights the three most important decisions your team must make.

If you want to do big things, you must first choose to be the change your team needs.

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